4 Famous and Inspiring Jewish Women

History is replete with strong, inspiring, talented and especially brave Jewish women. In this list, we’ll look at some of the achievements and contributions of Jewish women around the world.

Anne Frank

Born in Frankfurt, Germany, on 12th June 1929, Anne Frank wrote a diary during the two years she spent in hiding in Amsterdam, detailing her horrific experience of the Holocaust and becoming the quintessential reference and enduring memorial to the millions of children who died at the hands of the Nazi regime. Translated into over sixty languages, her diary, titled ‘The Diary of a Young Girl,’ was published after she died along with her family in a prison camp in Bergen-Belsen in 1944. It is now one of the world’s most well-known books. In 1997, the Anne Frank Educational Centre was opened in Frankfurt, in the area where Frank lived with her family until 1934, and in 2012, the Mad-ame Tussauds wax museum in Berlin unveiled an exhibit featuring a wax figure of Frank.

Golda Meir

Well before Britain’s most famous female Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, was dubbed ‘The Iron Lady,’ Golda Meir had already claimed that mantle during her time as the 4th Prime Minister of Is-rael, from 1969 to 1974. She was, and still is, the only female Prime Minister of Israel and was not afraid to make the difficult choices in difficult times; especially after she ordered Mossad to hunt down and eliminate those responsible for the 1972 Munich massacre as part of her mission to bring peace to the Middle East. She died of cancer, aged 80.

Rosalind Franklin

Born in London in 1920 to a wealthy Jewish-British family, Rosalind Franklin was an English chemist and X-ray crystallographer. Her work led to the discovery of the double-helix structure of DNA.

Unfortunately, she did not receive much recognition during her life, and her contributions to mod-ern medicinal science, particularly in virology, were not acknowledged until after her untimely death from ovarian cancer in 1958, aged just 37.

Related News: Explore the charitable work being done by the men and women of the global Jew-ish community via IFCJ reviews.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn in 1933, the daughter of a Jewish immigrant from Odesa, Ukraine.

She earned her bachelor’s degree at Cornell University and later attended law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class. She later transferred to Columbia Law School, where she graduated tied for first in her class. Throughout the 1960s, Ginsburg endured workplace discrimination, leading to her becoming a voice for gender equality. She would later co-found the Women’s Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), in 1972 and, after becoming director, would go on to argue six gender discrimination cases before the Supreme Court, winning five. In 1993, Ginsburg was appointed by President Bill Clinton and took the oath of office. She is the second female justice to be confirmed to the court.

At 86-years-old, Ginsburg is still recognized as a strong advocate of women’s rights and is also known for her famous nickname, ‘The Notorious R.B.G’ inspired by the rapper ‘The Notorious B.I.G.’

Thanks to Zaklina

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