Crown Sacrifices: What Royal Family Members Have to Give Up

What kind of monarchy is she in the 21st century? On the one hand, watching Prince Harry and Megan Markle’s story, which is happening in front of millions literally online, one would think that the pressure on members of the royal family has decreased. Elizabeth II approved the choice of his grandson and allowed him to marry a divorced Catholic Markle (although before the wedding she will accept Anglicanism).

Less than a century ago, however, the queen’s uncle had to give up the throne for love. Edward VIII wanted to marry Wallis Simpson, but his chosen one, who had already married twice before, was not acceptable to the court and the political elite of the country. Then on the night of December 11, 1936 Edward VIII made a speech on the radio: “I found it impossible to bear the heavy burden of responsibility and to perform the duties of king without the help and support of the woman I love”.

Prince Harry will marry – and marry for love, but this does not negate the fact that the British monarchy still strictly follows protocol. Thus, the spoonful of tar in the royal love story may be that Elizabeth II will ignore the wedding of her grandson. The Queen leads the Anglican Church, which is categorically against divorce (Megan Markle was already married to director Trevor Engelson). In 2005, Elizabeth, for the same reason, missed the civil part of the wedding ceremony of her own son Prince Charles, who was married to a divorced Camilla Parker Bowles. It’s true that she later showed up for church service.

If the members of the British royal family have enough blessing for the marriage of the Queen, then in Sweden, monarchs must obtain permission from the government. When Princess Victoria’s heiress to the throne in 2010 married her personal trainer Daniel Westling, her father – King Charles XVI Gustav – separately and fervently thanked the Swedish Riksdag.

In addition to clothing bans, there are more significant restrictions on royal family members. For example, they can’t vote. The Windsors and representatives of the Swedish Royal House must remain neutral and not influence the political decisions of their subjects. King Philip VI of Spain, however, does not hesitate to express his opinion. In autumn 2017, he made a statement on TV about the Catalan referendum on autonomy, calling it illegal. It’s also interesting to watch the public appearances of Monaco Royals.

True, the Spanish monarchs can secretly envy other royal families in Europe. The reason is the ban on the ownership of their palaces and mansions. Residences are owned by the state and temporarily used by monarchs.

And the history of Japanese Princess Mako reminds us of Edward VIII. The eldest granddaughter of the Japanese Emperor Akihito announced her engagement in autumn 2017. Her chosen one was a commoner, so after the wedding, Princess Mako will lose her title and part of her privileges.

Christmas together and no shouting at the corgi.

Can not be close to Elizabeth II and choose a country for Christmas holidays. The family spends the New Year holidays in one place – the residence of Sandringham. By the way, the queen is preparing for Christmas in advance. During the summer holidays, she starts signing greeting cards, the number of which reaches several hundred.

Royal prohibitions also apply to the Windsor vocabulary. In 2004, anthropologist Kate Fox published the book “Watching the British: Hidden Rules of Conduct”. Thus, Megan Markle should remember that members of the royal family do not use the word “posh”, instead of “couch” sit solely on the “sofa”, and about the “toilet” should just be forgotten. In royal circles, there is only a “lavatory”.

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