3 Ways Women Improve Health & Safety In The Workplace

Women represent nearly 39% of the global labor force, and they account for over 40% of the work force in many countries. Faced with several issues that are far different from those of working men, women are exposed to health risks due to the types of jobs they hold. Women are more likely than men to do contingent work, part-time work, or roles in the gig economy. This means that they are less likely to report injuries or accidents at the workplace. In addition, they are more vulnerable to sexual harassment or attacks and be affected by backbreaking work. The good news is that there are practical yet effective ways to improve your health and safety at the workplace.

Make Use Of Your Rest Breaks

Women are more likely to do repetitive work in prolonged postures that can lead to musculoskeletal disorders and injuries. Rest breaks allow the body to recover between periods of repetitive activity. While safety training and personal protective equipment (PPE) can reduce the risks in the workplace for injuries and accidents, you can also improve your health by doing some short exercises during your breaks.

Take a walk around the block or do some light stretching. Exercise improves your focus when you go back to your tasks, and it minimizes errors in repetitive tasks. If you’re on the keyboard all day long, schedule a burst of breaks to let your body rest. Stand up, walk to the water cooler, or climb stairs instead of using elevators.

Know Your Rights Regarding Violence And Harassment

Studies show that women are more often the victims of violence and harassment at work than men. Hence, according to FVF Law, it is in your interest to know your rights and duties should personal injuries arise at the workplace due to violence and harassment. Knowing the policies at work regarding unwanted conduct that is intimidating, degrading or humiliating, as well as acts that could endanger your health and safety, will make it easy to report physical and verbal forms of abuse. Workplace harassment and violence are not only illegal, but they can also affect your productivity, health, comfort and safety.

Manage Stress Levels

Women are more likely to do unpaid work at home, taking care of children and housework, which can contribute to stress and anxiety levels. Work outside of the home can only increase stress, which may lead to depression. Although stress can be good for you in meeting challenges or tight deadlines, when it becomes chronic and overwhelming, it can be harmful to your physical and mental health. Insomnia, heart disease, obesity and high blood pressure are some of the effects of stress at work.

Fortunately, there are steps that you can take to manage stress at the workplace. First, you need to track your stressors, identifying situations that create tensions and how you respond to them. Instead of fighting stress by heading to the vending machine to get snacks or drinking after work, think about engaging in different activities. Exercise is a great way to de-stress, as is reading, spending time with the family, taking up a new hobby, or going to a concert. Get adequate sleep, eat a healthy diet, and minimize stimulating activities at night. Meditation, yoga, and deep breathing exercises can also do wonders. Finally, talk to your supervisor, and get support from family, friends and colleagues to improve your ability to handle stress. If needed, you might want to consult with a therapist to help you manage stress and change unhealthy behavior.

Women can do several things to improve their health, well-being and safety in the workplace. Using rest breaks to exercise or take in fresh air can improve your focus while helping you manage your stress levels, preventing illnesses and psychological breakdowns. Furthermore, awareness of workplace violence and harassment can also prepare you for what to do if you are exposed to unwanted behavior that will compromise your health and safety.

Take a walk around the block or do some light stretching. Exercise improves your focus when you go back to your tasks, and it minimizes errors in repetitive tasks. If you’re on the keyboard all day long, schedule a burst of breaks to let your body rest. Stand up, walk to the water cooler, or climb stairs instead of using elevators.

Know Your Rights Regarding Violence And Harassment

Studies show that women are more often the victims of violence and harassment at work than men. Hence, according to FVF Law, it is in your interest to know your rights and duties should personal injuries arise at the workplace due to violence and harassment. Knowing the policies at work regarding unwanted conduct that is intimidating, degrading or humiliating, as well as acts that could endanger your health and safety, will make it easy to report physical and verbal forms of abuse. Workplace harassment and violence are not only illegal, but they can also affect your productivity, health, comfort and safety.

Manage Stress Levels

Women are more likely to do unpaid work at home, taking care of children and housework, which can contribute to stress and anxiety levels. Work outside of the home can only increase stress, which may lead to depression. Although stress can be good for you in meeting challenges or tight deadlines, when it becomes chronic and overwhelming, it can be harmful to your physical and mental health. Insomnia, heart disease, obesity and high blood pressure are some of the effects of stress at work.

Fortunately, there are steps that you can take to manage stress at the workplace. First, you need to track your stressors, identifying situations that create tensions and how you respond to them. Instead of fighting stress by heading to the vending machine to get snacks or drinking after work, think about engaging in different activities. Exercise is a great way to de-stress, as is reading, spending time with the family, taking up a new hobby, or going to a concert. Get adequate sleep, eat a healthy diet, and minimize stimulating activities at night. Meditation, yoga, and deep breathing exercises can also do wonders. Finally, talk to your supervisor, and get support from family, friends and colleagues to improve your ability to handle stress. If needed, you might want to consult with a therapist to help you manage stress and change unhealthy behavior.

Women can do several things to improve their health, well-being and safety in the workplace. Using rest breaks to exercise or take in fresh air can improve your focus while helping you manage your stress levels, preventing illnesses and psychological breakdowns. Furthermore, awareness of workplace violence and harassment can also prepare you for what to do if you are exposed to unwanted behavior that will compromise your health and safety.

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