Jacquelline Fuller – WOMAN of ACTION™

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A Celebration of Women™

is elated the Celebrate the Life of this one woman, one that made her way to the infamous role of CEO and true to the pure nature of a woman, directed her powers into an action of philanthropy. Her passion lays in the desire to help others, and through her own creations enables thousands to help themselves up through her vision of ‘getting the money directly into the hands that need it … ‘ system.

We celebrate this powerhouse and her focus on others.

She is known globally as Google’s “Director Of Giving” and Global Concerns And Action,

bettering the lives of others … women and children included.

 
 
 
 

WOMAN of ACTION™

 
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Jacquelline Fuller

 
 
 
 

Jacquelline Fuller leads Giving at Google which provides more than $50 million yearly to support tech innovators making transformational impact in areas such as education, development, disaster relief and renewable energy.

Director at Google Giving

Jacquelline Fuller Fuller joined Google in 2007 to help launch Google.org, and directs Google’s grantmaking and advocacy in support of Google’s sustainability and philanthropic efforts.

She previously served as deputy director of Global Health at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, where she was a member of the senior management team for eight years.

In 2004-2005, Fuller and her family moved to Delhi, India where she helped to launch a $300 million health initiative for the Gates Foundation. Prior experience also includes serving as speechwriter to US Secretary of Health and Human Services, Dr. Louis Sullivan. She also ghostwrote the inspirational autobiography, “Never Forget,” by Kay Coles James.

Fuller received her BA in political science from UCLA and a Masters in Public Policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. She serves on the boards of World Vision and the Eastern Congo Initiative.

Jacquelline Fuller, Head of Advocacy and Communication, Google.org discusses strategic collaboration.

Today, Google announced a new program called the “Global Impact Awards” to help jumpstart technology innovation in the nonprofit sector, an area that surely needs a kickstart.

impact_awards_with_shadow_gray_cmykGoogle also said it has given more than $100 million in grants, $1 billion in technology and 50K hours of volunteer time from its employees. If every company gave back like this, it would be a a better planet. This isn’t a time to be a cynic. This is real and true.

Here’s what Jacquelline Fuller, Director of Giving at Google (awesome title), had to say about it:

Today we’re launching the Global Impact Awards to support organizations using technology and innovative approaches to tackle some of the toughest human challenges. From real-time sensors that monitor clean water to DNA barcoding that stops wildlife trafficking, our first round of awards provides $23 million to seven organizations changing the world.

We’re proud to announce the first recipients of our new Global Impact Awards, which support organizations using technology and innovative approaches to tackle some of the world’s toughest human challenges. From real-time sensors that monitor clean water to DNA barcoding that stops illegal wildlife trade, our first round of awards provide $23 million to seven organizations that are changing the world.

With the type of clout that Google has in the tech space, and the world of innovation, this is an extremely important move for nonprofits to pay attention to. Basically, if Google can “put its money where its mouth is”, amazing world-changing things can happen.

Here are the seven nonprofits that will benefit from the program:

  • charity: water: Real-time technology to monitor water and ensure it gets to more people
  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life: DNA barcoding to identify and protect endangered wildlife
  • DonorsChoose.org: New program to enroll more underrepresented students in advanced classes
  • Equal Opportunity Schools: Data to identify high-performing yet underrepresented students
  • Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media: Tools to analyze and promote gender equality in media
  • GiveDirectly: Mobile technology to put money directly into the hands of the poor
  • World Wildlife Fund: New technologies to advance anti-poaching efforts

This program fits in nicely with what Google has done with Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the company, which includes projects like Crisis Maps for use when natural disasters are about to hit.

This all follows a slow trend of large companies “giving back” to the world in which they inhabit and benefit from. You can find more details about the program and the benefiting nonprofits at the Global Impact Awards site.

Today our post focuses on Google and it’s philosophy from day one of doing good and we hear directly how this is occur from Google’s Director of Charitable Giving and Advocacy, Jacquelline Fuller.

Jacqueline joined Google in April 2007 and is the Director of Charitable Giving. Google gives over $100 million each year to support education, technology access and renewable energy efforts. Jacquelline also leads advocacy for Google.org and Google’s clean energy initiatives. She previously served as Deputy Director of Global Health at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, where she was a member of the senior management team guiding efforts to influence public policy on behalf of Gates Foundation issues and grantees.

Lady-Inno-Summit1Jacquelline Fuller of Google moderates a panel.

In 2004-2005, Jacquelline and her family moved to Delhi, India where she helped to launch a nation wide HIV prevention initiative. Prior experience also includes serving as speechwriter and aide to U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services, Dr. Louis Sullivan. Jacquelline ghostwrote the inspirational autobiography, “Never Forget” by Kay Coles James. Jacquelline received her BA in Political Science from UCLA and a Masters in Public Policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. She serves on the Boards of World Vision and International Justice Mission.

Google.org, the search giant’s philanthropic arm, has struggled, but Google continues to give away money.

In 2011, it gave $115 million, the company announced Wednesday. Of that, $40 million came in charitable grants to four causes: science, technology, engineering and math education; ‘education for girls’ in developing countries; using technology to increase economic output and solve problems; and ‘fighting slavery and sex trafficking’.

Landmark-Ventures-interns.largeSal Khan, CEO & Founder of Khan Academy and Jacquelline Fuller, Google’s Director of Charitable Giving and Advocacy, at Social Innovation Summit 2012 in Silicon Valley

Though the company said the amount of money that Google gave away this year was about the same as it gave away last year, the company changed its approach this year.

Grants to nonprofit groups – which used to be made separately from Google.org, including holiday gifts of about $20 million that were given by the sales team — are now included under the Google.org umbrella.

After Larry Page, Google’s co-founder, took over as chief executive last spring, he revamped the company, including Google.org. Shona Brown, who ran business operations at Google, is now spending all her time running Google.org. Previously, Megan Smith, a business development executive at Google, spent part of her time managing Google.org.

Jacquelline Fuller, previously a spokeswoman for Google.org, is now its director of charitable giving.

jf 166173501Jacquelline Fuller, Director of Google Giving, makes an announcement about technology’s role in aiding anti-trafficking efforts at Google’s Washington, DC headquarters April 9, 2013 in Washington, DC. Google is announcing a $3 million gift to three nonprofits working to use technology and data to combat human trafficking worldwide. On Tuesday, officials announced a Google Global Impact Award in Washington to fund the Polaris Project, La Strada International and Liberty Asia.

googlegivesbackThe three groups are working in the US Europe and Asia to create a global network with local hot lines, sharing data to disrupt modern slavery. Google launched its Impact Awards in December to fund innovation among nonprofits using technology to scale up smaller projects.

Millions of people are held in slavery around the world. The US State Department has reported as many as 27 million men, women and children are held in bondage.

Since 2011, Google has given more than $14 million to stop human trafficking. AFP PHOTO / Karen BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
 

 

 
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Jacquelline Fuller, Google’s Director of #Giving
 

 
 
 
 

A Celebration of Women™

welcomes this philanthropic powerhouse into our global Alumni with open arms, looking forward to future collaborations and watching her grow stronger every year bettering the lives of others.

 
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Brava Jaquelline!

 

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